May 10, 2017 I Think I Love This

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Danny Bonaduce, Danny Bonaduce, Lion LN-1015, 1973

Lately we’ve seen the perceived quality of my featured records improve as the price goes up.  But what happens when the weird record budget also rises?  You guessed it, they get even weirder.  Some records that have no merit musically or struggle to entertain in a straightforward way, and also barely sold, can have real value as collectables.  It helps if the “artist” on these records is also known for something else.  Like William Shatner, whose The Transformed Man record included a stunning cover of Mr. Tambourine Man, Danny Bonaduce was on a semi successful TV show.  As “Danny” the wisecracking bassist for The Partridge Family (who never actually played a note), Bonaduce somehow managed to get a record deal as a solo artist.  No, this really happened.

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It’s not that he sings badly, it’s more like he doesn’t sing at all.  This is a horribly overproduced record, to the point where I seriously doubt it’s really even his singing.  But the real crime against humanity here is the material.  Danny Bonaduce was 13 in 1973 and yet his producers felt originals like Save A Little Piece For Me, a song not about birthday cake, and I’ll Be Your Magician, a song about seduction.  It’s really hard to listen to a pre-pubescent voice sing about using his magic wand to make “your resistance disappear”.

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Lion Records was a short lived budget label from MGM.  Budget labels were used when material came along that might tarnish the company’s main label.  In this case, MGM had a very good reason to release this on Lion, as the label folded just after this record came out.  I had heard about this record, and couldn’t believe it when I found it for $8 the other day.  It’s not a perfect copy, with original owner Patty York’s basement having flooded at some point.  Patty also dated the record on August 15, 1978, which would have been 5 years after the record came out, and 4 years after The Partridge Family was cancelled.  Still, it’s an incredible find, and I think I got a deal at $8.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $8, $150 Remaining

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March 18, 2017 Wanting To Be Wanted

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The Partridge Family, Up To Date, Bell 6059, 1971

The Partridge Family, a nominees for Best New Artist at the 1971 Grammy Awards, were hot when this, their second album came out.  David Cassidy was on his way to a brief stint as the leading national teen idol, and the records flew off the shelves.  It was all fake in reality, but this record hit #3 as the TV show wrapped up its first season.

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Like most teen idol records, this one is geared to appeal to the fans.  In this case, 14 year old girls.  For the first time, David Cassidy sings every lead, instead of the anonymous studio singers that sung half of the first album.  He even got his first writing credit, but it was the two top 10 hits I’ll Meet You Halfway and Doesn’t Somebody Want To Be Wanted that really pushed the album’s sales.  The latter song was absolutely hated by Cassidy and the show’s production was halted so producers and lawyers could convince him that he had to sing it, cheesy spoken interlude included.

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Besides the hits and the dimples. what also was included was a cool custom Partridge Family text book cover!  I had no idea that it did, but lo and behold, this pristine copy was neatly tucked inside this $2 copy.  Usually, inserts like this got used or pinned up on a wall, so finding one in mint condition is pretty rare.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $2, $291 Remaining

July 25, 2016 Puzzle People

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The Partridge Family, Crossword Puzzle, Bell 1122, 1973

By season four, The Partridge Family was in trouble.  Ratings were down and adding a 6 year old “neighbor” to drop by each week and sing a song didn’t work.  Records sales were down too, and gimmicks were added to try to boost sales.

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Their previous album, Shopping Bag, came with a genuine shopping bag.  I imagine they are quite collectable now, I know I’ve never seen one.  For their next to last album, the producers came up with a TV-Guide style crossword puzzle that this album’s original owner was able to solve in one try (though in pencil!).  You can tell that everyone was phoning it in by this point.

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They didn’t even bother to release a single from this opus.  The group, as it turned out already had their last chart single, and there’s really not a track on this record that would have made it up against the relatively strong pop year that was 1973.  Partridge records are all professionally  done, but this one is just really a puzzle as to why it exists.

Today’s Summary:

Cost: $2, $886 Remaining.