May 27, 2017 A Little Mansion Cleaning

IMG_1315

The Beatles, The Beatles Again (a/k/a Hey Jude), Apple SW-385, 1970

This is a really weird one.  Generally, a Beatles album is an example of a well crafted piece of pop music that will always stand the test of time.  The Beatles never took the easy road, they we always expanding horizons.  At least until this record came out.  In case you couldn’t tell from the cover photography, these are four Beatles who are not exactly comfortable in their surroundings and seem lost in what they are doing.  As it turns out, these pictures were taken at the last photo shoot the group ever had.  As another sign of the band’s problems, the photo shoot was in August 1969 at John Lennon’s estate and this album was released at the end of February 1970.  Apple was rotting at the core.

IMG_1316

The not so creative force behind this record was Alan Klein, John Lennon’s choice to run the group’s business affairs.  Mick Jagger had once remarked how Klein had saved The Stones from some British taxes, and that was good enough for John (and George & Ringo) to choose him to run their affairs (over Paul’s objections).  With sales of Abbey Road slowing down, and with no new recording going on or any idea when Phil Spector might be done editing the Get Back/Let It Be sessions for release, Klein needed a “new” album in stores to keep up cash flows and justify his existence.  The only thing to do was to look back to the group’s biggest hit, Hey Jude, and build an album of already released songs to go along with it.

IMG_1318

Ah, but what songs!  Since Hey Jude was never released on an album, the idea was to put it out with other past singles that had also never been released on an album in the US.  While they didn’t look as far back as Vee-Jay released songs like Misey, There’s A Place, and Love Me Do, they did start with the six year old Can’t Buy Me Love.  That song and I Should Have Known Better were both in A Hard Day’s Night, but that album was a United Artists release.  1966’s Paperback Writer and Rain are the other true oldies, with the rest of the songs being A and B sides from some non album singles.  But the whole package reeks of a cash in, and it came along at a time when tempers were high with the group.  This move didn’t help the internal struggles and three months later Paul announced he left the group.  This album was a nail in the coffin.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $5, $32 Remaining

May 22, 2017 Ain’t That A Lawsuit

IMG_1217

The Four Seasons, Ain’t That A Shame, Vee Jay 1059, 1963

I’ve written about The Four Seasons before, and how they were, for a while, the biggest group in the world.  I’ve also written about Vee-Jay Records, and how this little R&B label in Chicago ended up with both The Four Seasons and The Beatles on their roster.  This record came out at the time the band and the label had their falling out.

IMG_1218

It was the fourth Vee-Jay album released by the group in one year.  If that sounds like a lot, it’s because it was.  As Candy Girl was reaching its #3 peak chart position, the group began to realize they hand’t been paid for any of it.  The group not only sued, but also held back material from the company.  Vee-Jay, always desperate for cash, would mine this album for singles and re-titled Re-Releases for a year.

IMG_1219

And its not that good of an album!  Stay!, a cover song that was a very good cover version, is the best song on it.  The rest, however, is not the group’s best material.  The group must have been exhausted from all the writing and recording that they were just pooped out.  As was their record company, struggling to keep the lights on despite overwhelming success.  I just wish it was an album I actually liked..

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $5, $58 Remaining

May 16, 2017 E-Lec-Tri-City

IMG_1140

The Jackson 5, ABC, Motown MS-709, 1970

It’s no secret that 1970 was the year of The Jackson 5.  Besides The Beatles in 1964, no other artist exploded on the charts with such memorable songs as they did.  This was their second album, and it yielded their second and third #1 singles.  In a real passing of the torch moment, ABC knocked out The Beatles’ Let It Be  from #1, and a few weeks later, The Love You Save replaced The Long And Winding Road.

IMG_1141

This is real bubblegum soul music, both insanely catchy and seemingly simple, the songs are actually pretty intricate.  Unlike their first album, which featured songs with much more mature material, this album’s tracks are similar lyrically to the title track.  Reading the lyrics to ABC, you would think it was nothing more than a poem written by a 3rd grader.  It takes real talent write and produce something so light and have it end up as something significant or silly.  This album isn’t silly.

IMG_1142

Ok, perhaps the inner sleeve is.  Original period Motown albums all have printed inner sleeves featuring fan club news or new release ads.  Jackson 5 inner sleeves though, took this to an all time high in a kitschy, Tito-Rific way.  It remains unclear how many Soul-Mates Jermaine met or how many Marlon posters people paid $0.25 for, but reading one of these today is pretty great.  Any Motown record is collectible, and double that for a Jackson 5 record.  Because they weren’t usually bought by audiophiles, finding a decent one at a decent price is a challenge.  There’s one less out there now!

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $5, $117 Remaining

April 12, 2017 The Most Blogged About Record Of All Time

IMG_0887

The Beatles, Introducing The Beatles, Vee Jay 1062, 1964

Whole books have been written about this album.  Their themes deal with questions like:  How did a small Mom & Pop Blues label from the South Side of Chicago wind up with a 5 year contract on The Beatles?  How did Vee Jay Records manage to screw it all up so quickly?  How many counterfeits were made of this record?  And, why are there so many variations for this album’s track listing, outer jacket and record label?

IMG_0888

I would imagine to find and buy all variations of Vee Jay 1062 would take a decade and thousands of dollars.  An online source I just checked listed 16 cover variations and 31 label variations, and that’s just for legitimate copies.  It would be nuts to try to figure out variations of fake VJ 1062 records made in the last 53 years.  That guide tells me that this is a Version 2 (it includes Please Please Me and Ask Me Why, and not Love Me Do and P.S. I Love You) Mono cover with Please Please Me having a comma between the two Pleases.

IMG_0889

The record is a version 2 mono copy, with the simple silver on black label, without a stylized Vee Jay logo or color band.  It’s a fairly common combination, but I don’t care.  No matter the version, this is a great, fun album to have in any collection.  It’s the only album I know that features the songwriting team of “McCartney – Lennon”.  And because the Vee Jay engineer didn’t know what to do with Paul’s “One Two Three FOUR!” count-in on the master tape of I Saw Her Standing There, and he apparently didn’t know how to edit very well, the album begins with Paul shouting “FOUR!”   While it’s very easy to dismiss this album because all of the music has been reissued time and time again by EMI, I’d still call this record essential.  Who cares if you get a fake one for $10!

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $10, $225 Remaining

April 11, 2017 Somewhere In A $2 Bin

IMG_0884

George Harrison, Somewhere In England, Dark Horse DHK-3492, 1981

George Harrison’s career had all but stalled by 1980.  His custom label Dark Horse was distributed by Warner Brothers, and the early submission of this record was rejected for lack of commercial potential.  In November, 1980, Ringo Starr came to Harrison’s home studio to collaborate on some songs for his next solo record.  Harrison presented a nostalgic tune called All Those Years Ago to Ringo, but because it was too hard to sing, he rejected it.  They did finish the backing track together though, and Harrison moved on to other songs.

IMG_0885

A few weeks later John Lennon was murdered.  Harrison, alone with his thoughts and an unfinished album, rewrote the lyrics to All Those Years Ago as a tribute song to Lennon.  With Ringo’s percussion tracks already laid down, George asked Paul & Linda McCartney to come in and sing the background parts.  With the three surviving Beatles all performing together on their first track since the I Me Mine session in 1970, suddenly Warner Brothers was very interested in the album.  The public was too, and Harrison had his first big hit since 1973.

IMG_0886

Despite the success, there’s still a touch of morbidity about the record.  The other songs are paeans to God, tales of woe, or rants against the music business.  It’s one of the easiest Harrison albums to find these days because it sold so well and 36 years on everyone who wants one already has it.  I’m glad I have it, but I probably won’t play it more than once a decade.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $2, $235 Remaining

 

April 7, 2017 Latin Ala Whoa No!

IMG_0864

Peggy Lee, Latin Ala Lee, Capitol T-1290, 1960

I love a good Peggy Lee album, and this is one of her best.  I already had this album, but when I saw it a a store with a bulk purchase scheme, in this case 5 albums for $10, and I had 9 chosen, I added it to my pile and quickly left.  The jacket is in such good shape that I thought I could compare the one I had with this one and sleeve shift to create the best one from the two,

IMG_0865

I’m not the only one who liked this album.  Paul McCartney did too, and he learned The Beatles’ version of Till There Was You from this very record.  While it’s hard to imagine The Beatles covering a Broadway show tune, Peggy Lee showed how to completely rearrange one into something uniquely hers.  The Queen Mother herself applauded for The Beatles’ version when she heard it played live for her at the Royal Command Performance at the London Palladium.

IMG_0866

Unfortunately, this was the record I spent $2 on.  About 1/3 of its missing and it’s a cruel irony to read the original Capitol Records inner sleeve about “This Protective Envelope”.  At least I got that and a near mint jacket.  Sometimes one grades both sides of a record for how it plays, in this case, I would say that the right 2/3rds play much better than the left 1/3 does.  As for me, I’m off to the tattoo parlor have “always look at a record before you buy it” placed on my arm.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $2, $243 Remaining

March 31, 2017 A Day In The Life Of A Cheap Record Buyer

IMG_0509

The Beatles, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, Capitol SMAS-2653, 1967

While I sort of put down records like this yesterday, I only really meant that I’d rather have 20 fun albums for the $40 price of one clean copy of Sgt. Pepper.  I never said anything about finding a $2 copy though.  I’d seen this record for weeks before I bought it, sadly languishing in a $2 bin.  It’s clearly been though a pretty serious flood sometime in in the past 50 years.  The jacket is horribly warped, the spine is illegible, and there’s terrible ring wear.

IMG_0510

But it did have the semi-rare insert card, a odd collection of thick paper pop-out tiara, badges and mustache.  I know I tore mine apart when I first bought my first copy of this record, and I know I wasn’t alone in doing that, so finding an intact one is pretty rare.

IMG_0511

So one day, I looked at the record, expecting to see a badly scratched, mold encrusted record.   was planning on writing about why you should always save up for an especially nice copy of an essential record like Sgt. Pepper.  But what I found inside was a decent looking original stereo album.  I added it to my pile, and it was the first record I played when I got home.  It’s the best copy I own!  My guess is that the flood happened a long time ago and the record never got played again.  That it cost $2 is amazing, and I can look for a better cover for it.  So this column turned into one about taking a chance on something that looks like it’s inbox shape, but really isn’t when you get it home.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $2, $262 Remaining

March Summary:
$107 Spent, $3.45 per record