April 27, 2017 Foot Loose And Fancy (Virtually) Free

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Rod Stewart, Foot Loose And Fancy Free, Warner Brothers BSK-3092, 1977

For a hit 70s album, this Rod Stewart record trades at 80s flop prices.  It’s odd really, how some artists straddle the very fine line between “classic” and “cliche”. Rod Stewart is one of them.  While a similar selling Eagles or Fleetwood Mac album in similar condition would cost $8-$10, this record cost me $1 and there are plenty of copies online for $0.50.  Heck, even an Al Stewart album costs $2.

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And this is a pretty listenable album.  The big hit off it, You’re In My Heart, was not only a #4 hit, but also a really nice follow up to Stewart’s biggest hit Tonight’s The Night.  It’s not only self penned, but there’s no one else I can think of who could pull off the lyrics and still sound credible.  The rest of the album is a familiar mix of minor hits and Motown covers, but it’s actually pretty listenable.

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This near mint copy even has it’s usually missing lyric insert.  These things rarely survive  intact, and it just firm up what I think about records like this.  They will never be cheaper, and as time passes, they will be sought out.  I wouldn’t rush out and teach high and low for this one, but I also have plenty of room on my shelf for it.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $1, $200 Remaining

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August 23, 2016 $2 Ticket To The Follies

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Dawn, Dawn’s New Ragtime Follies, Bell 1130, 1973

I might be one of the only people alive to shed a tear about finding a copy of this record.  Don’t get me wrong, I would shed more tears over finding a $2 copy of Pet Sounds in the same condition, but this one gets me because I remember being at my grandparents house when my grandfather (born in 1909) came home in his brand new 1974 Oldsmobile Cutlass with a brand new copy of this record for us to listen to and celebrate.  It’s a wonderful memory of an awful album.

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In the scheme of things, it’s not awful in an uncommercial way.  Say Has Anybody Seen My Sweet Gypsy Rose was the #3 follow up to the #1 single of 1973, Tie A Yellow Ribbon On The ‘Ole Oak Tree, and no doubt it’s repeated airplay on 77 WABC  that fall that led to my grandfather purchasing the last album of his life (I did find a mint copy of Glen Campbell’s  Southern Nights 45 among the records when my grandparents finally sold their house in 1997, but no album newer than this one).

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Still, this record was the sort of music industry product that came out in a time of real change.  It appealed to the oldest and the youngest record buyers at the time when the music business was fracturing into irrevocable subsets that remain today.  But it’s records like this that people who had ANY kind of personal connection to that they go nuts for now.  Finding a copy in good condition for a decent price is something that no collector should let get away.

Today’s Summary:

Cost: $2, $823 Remaining