May 30, 2017 A Really Long Strange Trip

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The Grateful Dead, American Beauty, Warner Brothers WS-1893, 1970

For the 364th album that I am featuring during this year long exercise, I’ve chosen something by The Grateful Dead.  The perennially touring San Francisco based band that made a career out of touring and selling a peaceful laid back vibe for 30 years rarely had a hit record, but this one came close.  In classic Deadhead style, American Beauty took four years to achieve Gold status, and 16 years to reach Platinum.  The Grateful Dead never worked well with a deadline….

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1970 was the year of the twin classic Dead albums.  Workingman’s Dead came out in February, while American Beauty was released in November.  Both are highly influenced by Country and Bluegrass, along with a healthy dose of hanging out with Crosby, Stills Nash & Young.  For a while there the drugs were somewhat under control, and the band decided to really focus on writing and recording, in part to impress their new label, Warner Brothers.  When Rolling Stone last updated their Top 500 Albums list, Workingman’s Dead came in at #262 and American Beauty came in at #258.  They really are fraternal twins.

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Perhaps this record came in a tad higher because of the “hit” single Trucking’.  I always loved the fact that The Dead were so popular despite the fact that for years the #64 high chart position of Trucking’ was the biggest single the band ever had.  It wasn’t until A Touch Of Grey from In The Dark hit #9 in 1987 that Trucking’ was finally surpassed.  Because they have always been in demand, Grateful Dead albums are truly collectible today.  Finding this record for $8 is a minor miracle, especially given its condition.  Generally I try to play a record once before writing about it, but this clean copy of this amazing piece of Dead memorabilia has been in high rotation on my turntable since I found it.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $8, $11 Remaining

May 29, 2017 It Stoned Me Too

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Van Morrison, Moondance, Warner Brothers WS-1835, 1970

Sometimes a remarkable album comes out by someone you’d least expect from.  Yes, Van Morrison had made bit of a name for himself as the lead singer of Them, and with a slightly bubblegum-ish 1967 hit single, Brown Eyed Girl.  But who knew he had THIS in him?  Brown Eyed Girl was a big enough hit that he got a major label deal with Warner Brothers, and Morrison spent most of 1968 preparing his Warner’s debut, Astral Weeks.  It was a very jazzy and abstract record that was a hit with musicians and critics but didn’t really sell.

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Moondance was the follow-up, and Morrison spent most of 1969 writing and recording it in Woodstock New York.  When a half million hippies rolled into town, Morrison left for the city where he finished the record.  Dropping a needle on side one, the record opens with And It Stoned Me, a song that literally jumps out at you.  From there, you’re drawn in deeper and deeper until it ends.  Crazy Love, Moondance, and Into The Mystic are classics of their-or any other-era.  Yes, I love this record.

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Oddly, there were no hit singles from Moondance.  Come Running and Crazy Love were both released as singles, but neither charted.  For some bizarre reason, Moondance was released as a single at the height of the Disco era in 1977, when it climbed all the way to #92.  The album only reached #29 on the charts, but despite failing in all of the traditional measures of a hit album, Moondance still sold over three million copies.  It has probably never been out of print.  Naturally, I held out for an original Warner Brothers copy, with its gatefold cover and extensive liner notes.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $7, $19 Remaining

May 24, 2017 I Fell In

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Johnny Cash, Ring Of Fire: The Best Of Johnny Cash, Columbia CS-8853, 1963

Johnny Cash was one of a kind.  No other artist that I can think of managed to break all the rules while adhering to conventional norms.  Take this album for an example:  I always wanted to find the original album that featured Cash’s biggest hit Ring Of Fire.  I never found it because it doesn’t exist.  Cash placed the biggest single yet in Country Music on a greatest hits package.  It never was on a “regular” Cash album.

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I suppose you can’t argue with results.  This record was released in August 1963, and yet when Billboard published its first Country Albums Chart in January 1964, this was the #1 album.  Now, Beatles albums sometimes replaced other Beatles albums at #1, and The Monkees first two albums spent months at #1, but I don’t know of any album, Greatest Hits or not, that spent 8 months at #1.

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It’s mostly just a collection Cash’s Columbia singles from 1958-1963, so it doesn’t play now as a standard release might have.  But that also means that there’s not a dud to be found, and you really hear the progression of Cash’s style during these still early years.  It falls below my standard for an essential record, but its really nice to have.  I may have overpaid at $10, but it is a flawless original copy.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $10, $45 Remaining

 

May 23, 2017 I’m Blue

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Joni Mitchell, Blue, Reprise MS-2038, 1971

This is a very highly rated album with both critics and record buyers.  It’s #30 in the Rolling Stone Top 500 albums of all time if that appeals to you.  Of course, you’ll have to get past Joni Mitchell’s singing voice, which is very much an acquired taste.  While I happen to love this album, others would prefer listening to car alarms or animals in pain.

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The stand out track is California, which naturally enough was written in France.  James Taylor, who was Ms. Mitchell’s love interest at the time, plays guitar on it.  Like the rest of the album, it is so direct and honest that it’s almost feels like fiction, but this all really happened in real life.  As such, and despite both Carey and California being released as singles, neither was a hit on AM radio.

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But for $3, what does it matter?  Trust the Best Of lists and listen to this record.  Don’t compare the voice to another vocalist you like.  Listen to the words and the incomparable songwriting, it will grow on you.  And then you’ll get what Blue is all about.  As Alan Rickman says to Emma Thompson in Love, Actually “To continue your emotional education”.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $3, $55 Remaining

May 18, 2017 Like Aversion

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Madonna, Like A Virgin, Sire 9-25157-1, 1984

Time was, Madonna records weren’t that hard to find.  You’d even see them in Goodwill from time to time.  When that happens, I tend to never really getting around to getting a record like this.  After all, I grew up with the music, and, with so many of these popping up, I usually went with some other record that I’d never seen before.

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Then all at once it happened, Madonna records were no more.  As younger record buyers started shopping, these were the “classic” albums they were looking for and they all virtually disappeared.  The same happened to Michael Jackson and Prince records, but for the most part it only happened after their deaths.  Madonna records are probably gone from the bargain bins because they’re very good records for their era,

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To be fair, the mid-80s synth pop music hasn’t held up well.  The songs that pushed the boundaries of pop in the Reagan Era now seem cutsey and tame.  But the four Top 10 hits still get your feet moving, and this is a really fun album to have.  You’ll just have to shell out a little more for it now.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $15, $92 Remaining

May 16, 2017 E-Lec-Tri-City

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The Jackson 5, ABC, Motown MS-709, 1970

It’s no secret that 1970 was the year of The Jackson 5.  Besides The Beatles in 1964, no other artist exploded on the charts with such memorable songs as they did.  This was their second album, and it yielded their second and third #1 singles.  In a real passing of the torch moment, ABC knocked out The Beatles’ Let It Be  from #1, and a few weeks later, The Love You Save replaced The Long And Winding Road.

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This is real bubblegum soul music, both insanely catchy and seemingly simple, the songs are actually pretty intricate.  Unlike their first album, which featured songs with much more mature material, this album’s tracks are similar lyrically to the title track.  Reading the lyrics to ABC, you would think it was nothing more than a poem written by a 3rd grader.  It takes real talent write and produce something so light and have it end up as something significant or silly.  This album isn’t silly.

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Ok, perhaps the inner sleeve is.  Original period Motown albums all have printed inner sleeves featuring fan club news or new release ads.  Jackson 5 inner sleeves though, took this to an all time high in a kitschy, Tito-Rific way.  It remains unclear how many Soul-Mates Jermaine met or how many Marlon posters people paid $0.25 for, but reading one of these today is pretty great.  Any Motown record is collectible, and double that for a Jackson 5 record.  Because they weren’t usually bought by audiophiles, finding a decent one at a decent price is a challenge.  There’s one less out there now!

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $5, $117 Remaining

May 15, 2017 The Times Were A-Changin’

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Bob Dylan, Nashville Skyline, Columbia KCS-9825, 1969

Any Bob Dylan record is hard to come by in decent condition and at a decent price.  His records usually sold well, but they are all treasured by collectors these days.  Finding a decent Dylan record for $7 is a very happy occasion.  That it’s also one of his most enjoyable albums makes it even better.  While country music and Bob Dylan aren’t usually combined into one sentence, this album was the second of a three record phase from the chameleon like artist.  There was also a gospel phase and a standards phase yet to come, so maybe this isn’t really as strange as it might seem.

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Supposedly, Johnny Cash had written Bob Dylan a fan letter, which immediately was returned with a fan letter from Dylan to Cash.  They both were fighting with the same people at Columbia Records or creative control, they were both fiercely independent, and they became fast friends.  Bob Dylan’s only named collaborator of the 1960s was Johnny Cash.  They never did finish the duets album they wanted to, but Girl From North Country is a fantastic song from two guys who supposedly couldn’t sing.

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Never a fan of labels, Dylan was eager to cease being “the voice of his generation”.  This album helped do this, and it’s still a great listen today.  It would take a lifetime of looking to find every Dylan record, but that doesn’t mean I’m not going to try.  It’s hard to know now which ones are harder to find, 60s classics that changed the world (but that everyone hangs on to) or 90s flops that barely sold (and almost killed his career).  Neither are particularly easy to find at any price, so it’ll be all the more challenging to complete at bargain prices.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $7, $122 Remaining

May 14, 2017 Every Mother Had This Record

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Carole King, Tapestry, Ode SP-77009, 1971

This one is easy to fall in love with.  This is Sunday morning tea making music, rainy afternoon music, and Friday afternoon heading out of town music, all rolled up into one. This is a most essential album, and luckily for anyone who wants one, it is easily available.  Tapestry is #36 on the latest Top 500 Albums Of All Time list from Rolling Stone, yet it’s the only one you’ll find that places that high in neat mint condition for under $5.  Chalk that up to virtually every woman alive in 1971 buying and cherishing this album.

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Tapestry has hits past (Natural Woman and Will You Love Me Tomorrow) present (It’s Too Late and So Far Away) and future (You’ve Got A Friend).  But I almost feel that the non hits are why this record stayed on the Top 200 for 313 weeks.  Songs like BeautifulHome Again, and Smackwater Jack are what really make Tapestry so great.

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There’s no need to rush out and buy the first copy of this you see.  25 million copies sold mean that the near mint copy of your dreams is out there waiting for you.  Until you find it, flip through your Aunt’s record collection or hit a garage sale for a placeholder.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $4, $129 Remaining

May 13, 2017 Every Award You Take

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The Police, Synchronicity, A&M SP-3735, 1983

In 1983, Thriller hit the #1 position four times and spent 22 weeks on top of the charts.  It’s hard to imagine any record coming close to that in one year, but this album did.  Synchronicity spent 17 weeks at #1 and spawned the biggest selling single of the year.   It beat out (!) Thriller for album of the year at the 1983 Grammy Awards (Thriller won it in 1984 after spending the first 15 weeks of ’84 at #1 as well).  That kind of performance guarantees this album’s place on all of the usual “best of all time” lists, even though a mint condition copy of it sells for a few dollars.

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It could be that virtually every city in the world has a radio station that plays Every Breath You Take several times a day.  I would imagine that it will soon among the most ever played songs of all time, as fewer and fewer people feel the need to hear The Beatles’ Yesterday.  But the rest of the album hasn’t aged as gracefully.

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Because of it’s accolades and one of the biggest singles of the decade, I would call this an essential album.  The Police broke up just after it came out, so this was it as far as the very innovative band ever went.  But it’s usually just something that tends to sit on a shelf for year after year not being played.  Listening to the whole album for this post was a bit of an ordeal for me making me believe that Sting really was the King Of Pain.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $5, $133 Remaining

May 11, 2017 I Found That Loving Feeling

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The Righteous Brothers, You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling, Philles 4007, 1965

People that like listening to records tend to get a certain thrill from dropping a need onto a new (to them in my case) record for the first time.  It’s such an analog, tactile experience because there are the sounds of the needle hitting the vinyl and searching for the groove.  You never know when after hearing those when the music will begin, and even if you know the song that’s about to play, there is a moment where everything is quiet except the white noise of the vinyl.  The lead song from this album breaks that moment of anticipation better than almost any other record I know.

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Yes, The Righteous Brothers found out quickly that Phil Spector was, to be generous, a bit odd.  Not every producer names his own record label after himself and put is picture on his artists’ work.  But one listen of You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling on vinyl will at least validate the talent it took to make such a record.  It’s hard for me to believe I could find this record for $2, but such is the nature of looking at a lot of records.  A seller with 10 of these on hand in Portland sells something for $2 that would sell for $25 in New York.  Anything on Philles Records is very collectible, and good copies of albums by The Crystals and The Ronettes usually trade for over $100.  Why The Righteous Brothers two Philles Records don’t also is a bit odd, but I’m not complaining.

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Purists are that Phil Spector’s productions sound best in Mono, making this rarer Stereo copy less desirable, but now having both on my shelf, I lean towards the stereo version with one “Brother” having his own side of the wall of sound coming from the speakers.  This particular copy has the rare “Seen Weekly On Shindig” sticker on the intact 52 year old shrink wrap, which means this is not a second pressing.  The record plays flawlessly and even if Feeling is by far the best track on the record, it’s still a great listen.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $2, $148 Remaining