April 26, 2017 Outta Luck

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Elvis Presley, Pot Luck, RCA LPM-2523, 1962

This odd little Elvis album turned out to be quite a turning point for his career.  It was two years since Elvis was released from the army, and this collection was supposed to be the cream of the non-film soundtrack songs he had recorded.  While it did a respectable business, peaking at #4, it was dwarfed by the soundtracks to G.I. Blues and Blue Hawaii.

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I’m sure the schlocky packaging didn’t help, nor the melange of top 20 hits from 1961-62, but when the sales didn’t reach The Colonel’s expectations, he focused his protege’s attention to woking solely in films.  This would be the last non film or goapel album that Elvis would release un his “comeback” in 1969.

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Instead, Elvis’ albums became mirrors of the weak movie scripts he got.  The Elvis that changed the world didn’t do so by singing about clams, lemonade or nuns.  So while his 60s albums sold well, they’re not very collectable.  This flawless copy set me back $1 and i actually passed on a so-so copy of It Happened At The World’s Fair.  For me, it wasn’t happening and it would be something I wold never listen to.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $1, $201 Remaining

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December 19, 2016 Blue Christmas

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Elvis Presley, Moody Blue, RCA AFL1-2428, 1977

Naturally, it’s every record buyers dream to find a $2 record that turns out to be some rare collectible worth thousands.  This isn’t one of them, despite my momentary hope that it was.

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This was Elvis Presley’s last studio album.  Moody Blue had been a decent size hit in early 1977, hitting #1 on the country chart, but only #31 pop.  RCA wanted to release an album around it, but there wasn’t enough material recorded for one.  A followup single Way Down came out in June, and the company took some live recordings and previously unreleased (and horribly overproduced!) tracks to release this album in July.  They even pressed some copies on clear blue vinyl to tie in the theme of the title track.

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But then the unimaginable happened.  Elvis died, and suddenly this record was in serious demand, as was the Way Down single.  RCA cranked up their pressing plants, and due to the sentiment, pressed all of the records on clear blue vinyl.  An album that might have sold 75,000 copies sold over a million by the end of the year.  Nearly 40 years later, one might find one of them in a $2 and think they made a real find.  Oddly though, it’s the few thousand copies pressed on regular black vinyl that were pressed before Elvis died that are worth about $300 today.  Because vinyl variations usually mean rare, people try to hawk one of these for outrageous prices, when it was fairly priced at $2.

Today’s Summary:

Cost: $2, $554 Remaining