October 2, 2016 Some Of The Best

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The Everly Brothers, Best, Cadence CLP-3025, 1959

Without a doubt, The Everly Brothers were a hot act.  From 1957-1959, they had three Number Ones and several more Top Ten hits for the independent Cadence Records.  So, when they signed with the massive Warner Brothers Records, Cadence did what any self respecting independent label would do, rush release a greatest hits package.  A “Best Of” record usually came out after a group’s hey day, unless of course they were moving on to bigger and better things.  For Cadence, it was one more way to bring water from the Everly well.

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It looks like it came out so fast that they didn’t bother with any kind of write up about the duo, or reminiscing about the music.  The back cover does feature all of the other exciting albums the group had available for purchase from Cadence Records, however.

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I never really recommend buying these kinds of records.  For me, having the actual releases is always preferred.  But this is the legendary Everly Brothers at the very beginning of their amazing career, with not only their first few hits, but also a few B-Sides and minor releases.  It would be very hard to find any of their original records at an affordable price, and this is the original Cadence label, meaning its an original record.  It even predates their last few releases for the company.  So I added to my pile at my usual $2 shop, and was really happy to see it’s a highly valued record in with this label.  It’s only in VG condition, but its still (some of) The Everly Brother’s Best on the label that made them famous.

Today’s Summary:

Cost $2, $732 Remaining

June 17, 2016 Just In Time For Summer!

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Dr. Charles A. Bucher, Slimnastics, Decca 734546, 1959

No, Jane Fonda did not invent the workout record.  Richard Simmons was in grade school when Dr. Charles A. Bucher created the nonsense workout Slimnastics.  Make this record a must if you have a strong desire to touch your toes to public domain songs like Pop Goes The Weasel, and Tea For Two.  All played for meekly for you by an anonymous orchestra while the good doctor leads your through your paces.

A quick Google search for Dr. Charles A. Bucher tells me he was on President Eisenhower’s council for fitness.  This record came out in 1959, so he must have had some credentials to get the record deal with Decca.  Betty Draper probably had this record…

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Men and women each get their own side of the record, men on side one.  I’m sure there’s a joke in there somewhere, but I’ll let your imagination create your own.  This is all just the most basic fitness routine, and I can’t imagine anyone needing this record once they learn what a sit-up is.  And, oy, the music is just so corny.

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My absolute favorite part, though is the back cover.  The exercise tips are nothing more than the silliest common sense advice, especially my favorite, #7: “Include time for a shower or bath after your slimnastics”.

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I actually did the routine (for MEN, thank you very much) twice and felt no slimmer.  But I promise you, a record like this is amazing to have in your collection or frame for your workout area.  Just be sure to have enough room to do it (no obstructions)!

Today’s Summary:

Cost: $1, $972 Remaining

June 7, 2016 How Sad.

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Polly Bergen, All Alone By The Telephone, Columbia 1300, 1959

The idea for this blog came from being at a party the day after I’d been to an amazing record show in Portland.  There was a turntable going and everyone was talking about records and what I found, when a very smart grad student asked me “How do you know where to put the needle when you want to hear a particular song?”  Aside from suddenly feeling older than rocks, I was also validated for possessing knowledge that suddenly seemed en-vogue.  Buying a record in 1993 was uncool, but buying them if you were born in 1993 is Broad City Cool.

I’ve been waiting to find the right way to tell that story here, and today’s album seems like the perfect chance.  I’ll bet there are a lot of people out there that just can’t conceive of a time where you would have to wait by the telephone to hear form someone.  Imagine it’s 1959, your Studebaker is in the shop, and you’re all dolled up in your pink negligee.  But the phone isn’t ringing.  There is literally noting you can do but put on a Polly Bergen record.  And wait.

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I know The Beatles get all the credit with Sgt. Pepper for inventing the “concept” album.  I think that isn’t exactly true.  Sure, many teen oriented albums before The Beatles came along featured a hit single or two and were then filled by rerecording other people’s hits.  But almost all adult oriented albums had a consistent theme like this one.  It might seem like a  campy idea now,  but people in 1959 would have related to this album’s sentiment.

I just wish I enjoyed it more!  The orchestra is incredibly lush and the songs are just so bad that it took a real effort to listen to both sides.  Still, I’ll never get rid of this record, just because of the cover!  Miss Bergen was a gravelly-voiced actress first, and a torch singer second, hung around with The Rat Pack, and last acted in a memorable in a cameo in The Sopranos.  This $1 record is like a mini poster and it’s still a win for me.

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The VG+ record also came in a great Capitol Records inner sleeve.  There will be a posting on “sleeve shifting” just as soon as I find a Columbia inner sleeve holding a Capitol record.

Today’s Summary:

Cost $1, $982 Remaining