March 27, 2017 Mom Like Stereo Best

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The Smothers Brothers, Live At The Purple Onion, Mercury SR-60611, 1961

The Smothers Brothers began their long fruitful career in 1958 at San Francisco’s The Purple Onion.  The same small beatnik coffeehouse launched the careers of The Kingston Trio and Phyllis Diller, and this record is both of it’s time and ahead of it’s time for where The Brothers took musical comedy in the 60s.  They sing some of the the same folk songs as The Kingston Trio, but there’s a bite to them that is missing from the trio’s #1 albums for Capitol.

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But this really isn’t an update on the nature of the record, I’m writing today to show the lengths record companies went to to sell two different kinds of records.  Record sleeves of the classic vinyl era were made of cardboard that was then covered with what was called a cover slick.  It was more economical to produce a color front slick with a black and white rear cover slick.  But, because albums were released in both mono and stereo formats, front cover slicks had to differentiate between the two.

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The easiest thing to do was design an elongated front cover slick, with this record being a prime example.  The top edge would scream that this was a stereo record, suitable for those who had the money to invest in a true stereo sound system and pay 10% more to buy stereo records.  The bottom part of the front slick would be reserved for the more economical mono record purchaser.  The sort of Chevy Biscayne driving record buyer who’s home player was “affordable” or only had one speaker.  The record company could then fold either appropriate edge onto the back of the cardboard sleeve and cover the non applicable part with the back cover slick.  This Mercury jacket shows how easy it was to do.  Plus, I get to choose between stereo or mono when I need to hear The Smothers Cover of Tom Dooley.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $2, $270 Remaining

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