March 17, 2017 Kookie, Lend Me Your Catchphrase

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Edd Byrnes, Kookie, Warner Brothers W-1309, 1959

I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again; it’s very hard to start a record company.  Virtually all available talent that can sell records already has a record label, and without that talent you won’t sell many records.  Warner Brothers had the good fortune to have major film and TV production talent, and after the strange success of Tab Hunter’s recording career, Warner’s added an exclusive audio clause in all of their video contracts.

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77 Sunset Strip, a Warner show produced for ABC, debuted just as the new policy came into effect.  The show was a laid back affair about private investigators solving the problems of the most fortunate and beautiful people on Earth, all set to a smooth jazz sound.  Warners first released a soundtrack alum from the show, but the breakout success of a minor character named Kookie quickly led to a novelty hit and this follow-up album.  Kookie was famous for constantly combing his hair and speaking solely in late 50s teen slang.

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The album is no longer as ginchy as it once was.  Byrnes doesn’t really sing, he just sort of mumbles his way through his the script while arranger and conductor Don Ralke’s music plays underneath.  It’s interesting to listen to, but the nagging thought you’ll have after about 90 seconds is “why was this ever a hit”.  Then you’ll have 28:30 more to scratch your head and try to translate the words into 21st century English.  It’s not the kind of scene I usually dig dad, but while the record didn’t send me straight to snoresville pops, I don’t find it to be the maximum utmost.  Later, like dig.

Today’s Summary:
Cost: $5, $293 Remaining

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